Chopin Madmen of the piano redux Piano Piano Freaks Only!

Madmen of the piano redux

In an earlier posting titled “Madmen of the piano” I focused on composers. Here let’s focus on the pianists.

I’ve recently spent a lot of time updating my Chopin collection; seeking out the greatest pianists I can find.  The more I listen to these virtuosic dynamos … the more amazed I am that the human body can accomplish these feats. How can fingers move so rapidly? How can the rythym and timing of striking the right note go on and on … when it’s different between the two hands? – Sometimes a variable speed, rythm, reach and tone going on between the two hands. I don’t get it. I mean… they don’t all have a touch of Tourettes Syndrome do they!?

(*I remember reading that some Tourettes people have much faster reflexes and mechanical movements than normal)

Just listen to, and watch, what 10 fingers, 2 hands, 2 wrists and forearms can do!

(My vote for the “impossible” goes to Cziffra in the video)

Claudio Arrua plays Chopin’s Etude #1 op. 10

 

Georges Cziffra – Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 2

 

Martha Argerich – Chopin prelude 16, op. 28

 

Vladimir Horowitz – Franz Liszt / Tarentella


You have to see this to believe it!


6 Comments

  • Reply
    Emily
    02/06/2010 at 8:36 am

    Jim-You have really opened a can of worms, so to speak, with these performances. You could devote a whole website to madmen of the piano. Some of them have life stories almost as fascinating as their playing. I agree-the Cziffra is truly unbelievable.

  • Reply
    Steve
    28/05/2010 at 7:20 pm

    It only takes about 8 hours a day of practice for about 20 years to accomplish these feats! Actually, only a few ever accomplish them well. You’ve picked some great ones to watch and listen to. I agree, Cziffra is pretty spectacular.

  • Reply
    admin
    18/04/2010 at 5:13 am

    Hey Frank .. you forgot to give the link so folks can see Emily play. Hey – that was the title of Pink Floyd’s first hit! See Emily Play. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUx4t4W4eVY

  • Reply
    Frank Strauss
    17/04/2010 at 1:22 am

    I wonder how many hours a day Emily Bear practices.

  • Reply
    Suzie Foster
    16/04/2010 at 3:21 pm

    It only takes about 8 hours a day of practice for about 20 years to accomplish these feats! Actually, only a few ever accomplish them well. You’ve picked some great ones to watch and listen to. I agree, Cziffra is pretty spectacular.

  • Reply
    Frank Strauss
    16/04/2010 at 12:29 am

    Jim-You have really opened a can of worms, so to speak, with these performances. You could devote a whole website to madmen of the piano. Some of them have life stories almost as fascinating as their playing. I agree-the Cziffra is truly unbelievable.

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    Bear