Stamitz

Easy Listening

In my ongoing research into composers I hadn’t been exposed to  Carl Stamitz (1745 – 1801) http://www.answers.com/topic/carl-stamitz

As I listened to a number of pieces, the phrase “Easy Listening” came to mind. It is easy to listen to! And then I began to wonder: What separates him from his great contemporaries (Mozart, Haydn and Hummel etc.) ?  Why is he a “lightweight?” Althought the melodies and musicality are there, what keeps the music from being profound or inspired? Would a few touches of complexity in the midst of his simplistic composition elevate it to greatness? An inspired background counterpoint? Why couldn’t he do it?

(* Sorry … these are just the ramblings of a Classical dilettante!)

3 pieces lasting about 12.5 minutes

Orchestral quartet in G major 2nd movement

Concerto for 2 clarinets #4 in B flat major 3rd movement

Cello concerto no. 1 in G major Romance

Stamitz


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    Jim's Classical Music » A Baroque “Lightweight”?
    16/06/2011 at 6:55 am

    […] Someone gave me a CD of Charles Avison’s music (1709 -1770) Whilst listening, the label “lightweight” came to mind. The music is pleasant enough, easy to listen to, and that reminded me of a contemporary of Avisons’ – Johann Stamitz – whos music I found to be similar in it’s easy listening quality. http://jimsclassicalmusic.com/2010/03/14/easy-listening/ […]

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